Fleet Street Walk

Every Marketor knows the importance of communications. After all, no matter how brilliant the marketing strategy, it is only effective when communicated to the target audience.

In the 1920s most large London ad agencies plied their trade in Aldwych and Kingsway because they were close to Fleet Street, the centre of the newspaper industry - their major media outlet (and clients). While the agencies eventually moved on to Soho and beyond, the hacks continued in Fleet Street until just after the turn of the century.

So, join the Marketors as we walk through the history of the development of communications in our great city. Until 2005, when the last two journalists left, Fleet Street and environs have for centuries been the places from which the news of the day has emanated.

We will travel from Paul’s Cross, where news was proclaimed by criers, to the area where scribes stationed themselves so they could be found by those needing assistance in reading and writing. And then on to the adoption of printing, and the realisation that money could be made from spreading information.

We will see the street where gossip was converted to news, and the decisions in the two great bookending courts, civil and criminal, were reported to an eager public. (The publishers were likely as interested, for themselves, in the libel cases being adjudicated in the Royal Courts where damages continue to be assessed to this day.)

Every Marketor knows the importance of communications. After all, no matter how brilliant the marketing strategy, it is only effective when communicated to the target audience. In the 1920s most large London ad agencies plied their trade in Aldwych and Kingsway because they were close to Fleet Street, the centre of the newspaper industry - their major media outlet (and clients). While the agencies eventually moved on to Soho and beyond, the hacks continued in Fleet Street until just after the turn of the century.

We will see the buildings where great publishing empires shaped the opinions of the British Public.

The tour will finish at the Old Bank of England pub, for a spot of lunch. The building was constructed as the Law Court’s branch of the Bank of England to facilitate the work of the civil judiciary (1888 to 1975) and retains the grandeur befitting a City branch of the Bank. As a macabre aside, the pub claims to be located between the shop of the Demon Barber, Sweeney Todd, and the pie shop of his lover, Mrs. Lovett. But don’t let that put you off your lunch!

To book tickets:

Date: Saturday 19th October 2019

Time: 10:30am - 12:45pm

Dress: Comfortable shoes and suitable clothes for the weather. REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR MARKETORS BADGE

Cost: £30 per person, to include a main course at lunch

Meeting Place: North entrance of the crypt of St. Paul’s Cathedral (the entrance facing Paternoster Square). Look for the man in the hat.

Nearest Tubes: St Paul's, Mansion House, Blackfriars

Nearest Trains: City Thameslink, Blackfriars, Cannon Street

To contact the Event Director, email Sunila Labo on sunila.labo@icloud.com

Booking Deadline: September 30th 2019

Refund Policy: NO REFUNDS